Geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona. Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship : Fiona Tolhurst : 9781349447398 2019-01-25

Geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona Rating: 8,9/10 1426 reviews

Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

In terms of its general historiographic emplotment, The History of the Kings of Britain narrates pre-Saxon British history as a long decline. Fiona Tolhurst demonstrates that Geoffrey not only creates precedents for the future reign of Empress Matilda in England but also presents female rule as an attractive and beneficial alternative to male immorality and incompetence. Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and Fiona Tolhurst, literary inheritors of the feminist Arthurian legacy, these essays pay tribute to Maureen Fries, who played a ground-breaking role in re-examining traditional perceptions of the stories of King Arthur and his court as well as preconceptions about women scholars. The representation of Wales in Medieval English culture was created as, and has remained, a discourse shaped from the repetition of often artful forgettings and historical errors, repeated to sustain complex and sometimes mutually contradictory ideological agendas. The playwright qualifies or tempers the potentially subversive nature of this argument by plotting a complicated strategy of comparison which deconstructs the dichotomy of good and bad, moral and immoral. In it I will argue that the female figures. She is the author Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Feminist Origins of the Arthurian Legend and is the editor of a special issue of Arthuriana on Geoffrey of Monmouth as well as the co-editor, with Bonnie Wheeler, of On Arthurian Women: Essays in Memory of Maureen Fries.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the translation of female kingship (eBook, 2013) [yamakyu-fukuya.co.jp]

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

The work provides a lengthy and detailed account of a prehistoric period for which no history in any currently accepted sense can be written. Howe traces the migration myth throughout the literature of the Anglo-Saxon period, in poems, sermons, letters, and histories from the sixth to the eleventh centuries. This article surveys a range of twentieth-century scholarly discourse concerning Geoffrey of Monmouth's apparent political sympathies in his mid-twelfth-century Anglo-Latin The History of the Kings of Britain, especially in regard to his stance toward the Welsh and his use of source materials. Geoffrey of Monmouth in his History of the Kings of Britain is widely considered to have transgressed the historiographical canons of his time. Jargon, strings of quotations that Tolhurst doesn't use to elucidate anything, poor word choice and phrasing, and statements which are just plain wrong: I can't find anything to praise in this book. “Howe’s book is of value not only to scholars of medieval English literature but highly suitable for mythographers, cultural historians, anthropologists, and theologians. Geoffrey of Monmouth and the translation of female kingship.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

A collection of critical essays on female characters in Arthurian literature and biographical essays on women Arthurian scholars. Texts The earliest prose romances tell stories of the Grail and its eventual relations with King Arthur's court. The lack of effective executive authority from the king means that responsibility for the construction and preservation of the Arthurian polity falls on others with a stake in governance: Merlin, Guinevere, Morgan, Nenyve, and the Round Table knights. This chapter follows the fortunes of Arthur as a figure contested and celebrated in equal measure between Malory's Morte Darthur 1485 , and Milton's History of Britain 1670. In tandem with this larger narrative structure, Geoffrey's strategic use of the prophecies of Merlin likewise subverts any potential rallying point for British or Welsh resurgence. Fiona Tolhurst offers a feminist analysis of the non-Arthurian portion of Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'History of the Kings of Britain'. Besides reviewing the testimony of twelfth-century authors who used or criticised the Prophecies, she looks at commentaries on the Prophecies, both published and unpublished, written by contemporaries.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship by Fiona Tolhurst

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Feminist Origins of the Arthurian Legend offers the first feminist analysis of the Arthurian section of Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain and his Life of Merlin. Counsel, always an intimate part of medieval governance, becomes crucial to the redefinition of Arthurian rule. I was searching for material on Geoffrey of Monmouth's position on Matilda Empress. Looked at closely, Milton's disparaging of Arthur appears less absolute, refashioning as it does Malory's Arthurian political allegory. In this article, the author considers the evidence for the reception of Merlin's Prophecies and its implications for the reception of the history in which they were located.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship by Fiona Tolhurst (review)

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

In addition to many published articles and essays, Howe is the author of The Old English Catalogue Poems 1985 , editor of Irving Howe’s Critic’s Notebook 1995 , and co-editor of Words and Works , 1998. Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Feminist Origins of the Arthurian Legend provides the first feminist. Fiona Tolhurst demonstrates that Geoffrey not only creates precedents for the future reign of Empress Matilda in England but also presents female rule as an attractive and beneficial alternative to male immorality and incompetence. Her study adds a new dimension to contemporary scholarship by proposing that the word 'feminist' can be used to describe this history that - in contrast to the works of Geoffrey's predecessors, redactors, and early translators - presents female rule positively. While Tolhurst's book is a feminist reading of Geoffrey of Monmouth, it will appeal broadly to historians, medievalists, literary critics, and students of one of the most innovative writers of the Middle Ages. In contrast to recent critics, especially Monika Otter and Michelle Warren, who see Geoffrey's enormously popular and influential pseudo-history as fundamentally ambivalent or ambiguous, the present author aligns Geoffrey with his Norman patrons and contends that The History of the Kings of Britain creates a past that posits the ancient Britons, the ancestors of the twelfth-century Welsh, as eminently fit for conquest. Fiona Tolhurst demonstrates that Geoffrey not only creates precedents for the future reign of Empress Matilda in England but also presents female rule as an attractive and beneficial alternative to male immorality and incompetence.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

Her study adds a new dimension to contemporary scholarship by proposing that the word 'feminist' can be used to describe this history that - in contrast to the works of Geoffrey's predecessors, redactors, and early translators - presents female rule positively. Even those who do not support feminist interpretations will value her assessment of Matilda's female kingship. The four central elements of this consensus might be classified as the discourse of Britishness, the discourse of authority, the discourse of peripherality, and the discourse of unequal value. Political rather than aesthetic considerations led Wace to omit Merlin's prophecies from the Roman de Brut c. This study complements Howe’s previous scholarship and assumes, by its authority and integrity of presentation, the status of a standard in contemporary scholarship relevant to Anglo-Saxon England.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Feminist Origins of the Arthurian Legend by Fiona Tolhurst

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

We can learn much more about medieval culture about literacy, memory, patronage, etc. Documentation is thorough, and most footnotes are annotated; the bibliography is exhaustive. This book is a pleasure to read, and will become an essential part of chronicle, narratological, and feminist scholarship. Here, Fiona Tolhurst argues that Geoffrey's history presents the marriage of Queen Igerna and King Uther as founded upon both love and equality, Igerna and Uther's daughter Anna as a pivotal figure in British history, and Queen Ganhumara as King Arturus's partner in power. Derived partly from verse romances composed by Robert de Boron Roman de lestoire dou Graal, Merlin, Perceval , these narratives coincide with French prose accounts of the Fourth Crusade Robert de Clari, Geoffroi de Villehardouin, Henri de Valenciennes and translations from Latin histories of more distant events Pseudo-Turpin, Histoire ancienne jusqu'à César, Li fet des Romains.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the translation of female kingship (eBook, 2013) [yamakyu-fukuya.co.jp]

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

Marie de France does so quite openly— and courageously; with Walter Map, the irony and vertiginous wit with which he suffuses his De Nugis Curialium may threaten to derail his acts of textual resistance. Building upon the mainly philological and historicist approaches of the past, this volume offers. With this rich set of characters and opportunities, the playwright creates a variety of situations in which stereotypically virtuous choices especially sexual and marital choices are shown to have unexpectedly corrupt or disappointing consequences in order to suggest antithetically that stereotypically wicked choices may, similarly, have surprising, which is to say rewarding, results. Tolhurst's publications focus on medieval Arthurian literature in Latin, Old French, and Middle English; medieval women writers; and Arthurian literature from 1900 to the present. The chapter ends with the only Galfridian representation of female king to demonstrate the subtlety between regent queenship and female kingship.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship by Fiona Tolhurst

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

Author Biography Fiona Tolhurst is Maitre Assistante in Medieval and Early Modern English at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. Malory depicted the French wars under the guise of Arthur's sixth-century campaign against Rome, and Arthur was key to medieval and Renaissance representations of sovereignty and resistance. —Renaissance and Reformation Nicholas Howe is professor of English at the Ohio State University and director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship provides the first feminist analysis. In The Birth of Merlin the playwright uses the legend and example of Merlin to legitimize the use of demonic magic by Christian kings. Although Geoffrey has Brutus kill his enemies in and near the river rather than, like Moses, cause the waters to drown his enemies 9:11-17.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth and the Translation of Female Kingship

geoffrey of monmouth and the translation of female kingship tolhurst fiona

In this chapter, I consider contemporary advice books as well as the practice of rule in fifteenth- century England to illuminate the quality and standard of advice-giving and advice-taking and the dynamics of rule in the Arthurian polity. The crucial importance of studying how such premises were formulated and promoted in the medieval period to describe the status of Wales as a conquered and colonized subject lies in the continuing persistence of these discourses, through a combination of intellectual inertia and the embedding of privilege, to the point where they have become all but invisible, but remain potent. On the other hand, a number of writers, in their own ways, attempt to resist or subvert some or all of the colonialist aspects of the Matter of Britain. To do this he creates a plot interweaving four representations of female sexual behavior, four kings, four sorcerers or magicians, and four magical contests. The Reformation and the rise of antiquarianism engendered suspicion of medieval sources, and Arthur and Brutus were undone by the rise of Anglo-Saxon studies.

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