The dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian. Dynamics Of Ancient Empires, Walter Scheidel 2019-03-04

The dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian Rating: 8,9/10 1246 reviews

The Dynamics of Ancient Empires; ISBN: 9780195371581

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

Near Eastern texts, and knowledge of their languages, only appeared in large amounts in the later nineteenth century. Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. This volume is an ambitious cross-cultural perspective of the ancient empires in a series of case studies based on political theory as well as on recent archeological research. A final chapter draws on the findings of evolutionary psychology to improve our understanding of ultimate causation in imperial predation and exploitation in a wide range of historical systems from all over the globe. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons.

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The Dynamics of Ancient Empires: State Power from Assyria to Byzantium

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. Yet despite empires' prominence in the early history of civilization, there have been surprisingly few attempts to study the dynamics of ancient empires in the western Old World comparatively. Bedford's Union College, Religion treatment of the Neo-Assyrian Empire follows. The next 2,500 years witnessed sustained imperial growth, bringing a growing share of humanity under the control of ever-fewer states. The E-mail message field is required. Neither Karl Marx nor Max Weber could make much use of this material, and not until the 1920s were there enough archaeological data to make syntheses of early European and west Asian history possible. Given the proximate cause of Persian collapse being Alexander of Macedon, this slant has its merits and leads, neatly enough, to the next essay.

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The Dynamics of Ancient Empires

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. A final chapter draws on the findings of evolutionary psychology to improve our understanding of ultimate causation in imperial predation and exploitation in a wide range of historical systems from all over the globe. The next 2,500 years witnessed sustained imperial growth, bringing a growing share of humanity under the control of ever-fewer states. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers—the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires—ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. A substantial introductory discussion of recent thought on the mechanisms of imperial state formation prefaces the five newly commissioned case studies of the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Roman, and Byzantine empires.

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Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2009.10.14

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

Indeed, so far as literary sources are concerned, most are Greek, many of them being hostile. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers--the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires--ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. All the essays are intelligent, informed and well-sourced. Yet despite empires' prominence in the early history of civilization, there have been surprisingly few attempts to study the dynamics of ancient empires in the western Old World comparatively. The Greater Athenian State, Ian Morris. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. A final chapter draws on the findings of evolutionary psychology to improve our understanding of ultimate causation in imperial predation and exploitation in a wide range of historical systems from all over the globe.

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The Dynamics of Ancient Empires; ISBN: 9780195371581

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

Keith Hopkins Cambridge, Ancient History concentrates on his specialty, economics, as regards the Roman Empire, focusing on the Principate of 31 B. Contributors include John Haldon, Jack Goldstone, Peter Bedford, Josef Wiesehöfer, Ian Morris, Walter Scheidel, and Keith Hopkins, whose essay on Roman political economy was completed just before his death in 2004. Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. Neither Karl Marx nor Max Weber could make much use of this material, and not until the 1920s were there enough archaeological data to make syntheses of early European and west Asian history possible. The empires under discussion are Neo-Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, Athens, Rome, and Byzantium. A substantial introductory discussion of recent thought on the mechanisms of imperial state formation prefaces the five newly commissioned case studies of the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Roman, and Byzantine empires. This introduction is short—only twenty-seven pages—and almost intimidatingly dense.

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Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2009.10.14

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

The entities focused upon are the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid, Athenian, Roman and Byzantine Empires, with substantial excurses into Sparta and the early Islamic Caliphate—a range of about 1500 years. In particular, although the objective of the volume is to set the stage for a comparative analysis of state power in the ancient world, there is no real attempt to do so systematically across the chapters, and the individual chapter authors are left to range freely in their discussion of a particular empire with little in the way of comparison with what their co-authors have contributed. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers--the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires--ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. Yet despite empires' prominence in the early history of civilization, there have been surprisingly few attempts to study the dynamics of ancient empires in the western Old World comparatively. As a result, Greek and Roman empires have largely been studied in isolation from those of the Near East.

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Ian Morris & Walter Scheidel: Dynamics of Ancient Empires (ePUB)

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

A substantial introductory discussion of recent thought on the mechanisms of imperial state formation prefaces the five newly commissioned case studies of the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Roman, and Byzantine empires. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. Ancient States, Empires, and Exploitation: Problems and Perspectives, Jack Goldstone and John Haldon. While controversial, this angle is certainly provocative and, as Scheidel amply demonstrates, heuristically productive. Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers--the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires--ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. In particular, although the objective of the volume is to set the stage for a comparative analysis of state power in the ancient world, there is no real attempt to do so systematically across the chapters, and the individual chapter authors are left to range freely in their A discussion of the systems of rule and rulership in the ancient empires of the Near East and Western Europe.

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Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2009.10.14

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

As a result, Greek and Roman empires have largely been studied in isolation from those of the Near East. As a result, Greek and Roman empires have largely been studied in isolation from those of the Near East. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. Neither Karl Marx nor Max Weber could make much use of this material, and not until the 1920s were there enough archaeological data to make syntheses of early European and west Asian history possible. This allows the author grounds for a substantive discussion of state—as opposed to empire—formation. Such grand comparisons were popular in the eighteenth century, but scholars then had only Greek and Latin literature and the Hebrew Bible as evidence, and necessarily framed the problem in different, more limited, terms. His thesis is that the Neo-Assyrian period of domination was not primarily about the control of territory, but of goods and services.

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The Dynamics of Ancient Empires: State Power from Assyria to Byzantium (review), Journal of World History

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Josef Wiesehöfer's University of Kiel, Ancient History discussion of the Achaemenid Empire covers a shorter range, ca. Yet despite the global prominence of empire, individual cases are often studied in isolation. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers-the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires-ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. Contributors include John Haldon, Jack Goldstein, Peter Bedford, Josef Wiesehofer, Ian Morris, Walter Scheidel, and Keith Hopkins, whose sparkling essay on Roman political economy was completed just before his death in 2004.

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The Dynamics of Ancient Empires

the dynamics of ancient empires scheidel walter morris ian

Neither Karl Marx nor Max Weber could make much use of this material, and not until the 1920s were there enough archaeological data to make syntheses of early European and west Asian history possible. But one consequence of the increase in empirical knowledge was that twentieth-century scholars generally defined the disciplinary and geographical boundaries of their specialties more narrowly than their Enlightenment predecessors had done, shying away from large questions and cross-cultural comparisons. A substantial introductory discussion of recent thought on the mechanisms of imperial state formation prefaces the five newly commissioned case studies of the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid Persian, Athenian, Roman, and Byzantine empires. Series Title: Responsibility: edited by Ian Morris and Walter Scheidel. The entities focused upon are the Neo-Assyrian, Achaemenid, Athenian, Roman and Byzan Writing reviews of books which assemble articles by a variety of authors is difficult, thorough treatment requiring coverage of each piece.

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