Thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry. On Asian American Form 2019-02-01

Thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry Rating: 8,6/10 1556 reviews

Thinking its presence : form, race, and subjectivity in contemporary Asian American poetry (Book, 2014) [yamakyu-fukuya.co.jp]

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Thinking Its Presence calls for a radical rethinking of how American poetry is being read today, offering its own reading as a roadmap. The book, which has also given its name to a organized by Prageeta Sharma and Joanna Klink, is a brilliant case study of the ways race is embodied in both poems and in literary discourse, as well as a powerful reading of several Asian American writers. I doubt I am the only literature professor who frequently exhorts students to pay as much attention to literary form as to the content. They make concrete the alienating circumstances under which Asian American poets write. Your story needs to be told.

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Thinking its presence : form, race, and subjectivity in contemporary Asian American poetry (Book, 2014) [yamakyu-fukuya.co.jp]

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

In art, formal innovation versus identity politics. Wang does to the writings of Li-Young Lee, Marilyn Chin, John Yau, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge and Pamela Lu. They have the potential not only to encourage experimental poets and critics to more fully acknowledge race in literary works, but also to help more nonwhite readers and writers find relevance in experimental poetry. Wang questions the tendency of critics and academics alike to occlude the role of race in their discussions of the American poetic tradition and casts a harsh light on the double standard they apply in reading poems by poets who are racial minorities. Rather, it suggests that all works about race are not the same.

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Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

The book advances two main arguments. Thinking Its Presence 2017 Conference on Race, Creative Writing, and Art to be held at the Poetry Center From October 19-21, 2017, Thinking Its Presence will bring together the discipline and art of pedagogy and the arts in general with perspectives from critical race theory, poetics, performance studies, literary theory, literary history, ethnic literatures, and Native American and Indigenous studies. While focusing on the work of five contemporary Asian A When will American poetry and poetics stop viewing poetry by racialized persons as a secondary subject within the field? That is, in contrast to those who conflate form and politics, arguing that broad formal modes inexorably embody an ideology, Wang suggests that this relationship is not at all determined and manifests differently even among avant-garde authors writing in similar modes. If it passes approval, which it always does after a few revisions are made, the story is sealed away in a vault. Thinking Its Presence calls for a radical rethinking of how American poetry is being read today, offering its own reading as a roadmap. Telling these and other stories from unexpected points of view challenges our sometimes limited view of Asian Americans and adds complexity to our understanding of their relations with white and ethnic others.

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Thinking Its Presence by Dorothy J. Wang (ebook)

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

I highly recommend this book. Aesthetically, Li-Young Lee, whose work is often called Romantic and who has gained perhaps the most popular acceptance of all the poets examined in the book, could not be farther, formally, from Pamela Lu and Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge. Here is one of several passages Wang cites, from among the many associations the speaker brings to his reflections on the butcher Wang 86 : and the standing deaths at the counters, in the aisles, the walking deaths in the streets, the death-far-from-home, the death- in-a-strange-land, these Chinatown deaths, these American deaths. The conference brings together the discipline and teaching of creative writing with perspectives from critical race theory, poetics, performance studies, literary theory, literary history, ethnic literatures, and Native American and Indigenous studies. New forms shape consciousness, and a project of the avant-garde is to challenge conventions in thought through innovation in form.

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Identity and the Avant

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Wang makes an impassioned case that now is the time. Instead, reading—and in particular, close readings of the artful interaction of text and context —requires a different quality of attention. Series Title: Responsibility: Dorothy J. In contrast with experimental work by white artists, work concerned with racial or ethnic experience is often derided as lacking sophistication. This is the first sustained study of the formal properties in Asian American poetry across a range of aesthetic styles, from traditional lyric to avant-garde. Yet the avant-garde cannot claim any easy association between innovative language and movements for justice.

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Free Download Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Wang makes an impassioned case that now is the time. Thinking Its Presence calls for a radical rethinking of how American poetry is being read today, offering its own reading as a roadmap. Wang's passionate meditation on the inseparability of aesthetics and politics in poetry and poetics will fundamentally transform the ways in which we think racial difference and form in the literary. Thinking Its Presence calls for a radical rethinking of how American poetry is being read today, offering its own reading as a roadmap. In service of this important artistic and political goal, Dorothy J. Wang argues with conviction that critics should read minority poetry with the same attention to language and form that they bring to their analyses of writing by white poets.

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Racial Asymmetries: Asian American Fictional Worlds / Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry / Foreign Accents: Chinese American Verse from Exclusion to Postethnicity, American Literature

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Wang makes an impassioned case that now is the time. Whether the poet treats race thematically, as Li-Young Lee, Marilyn Chin and John Yau do, or through formal means and experimental strategies, as Wang argues for Mei-mei Berssenbrugge and Pamela Lu, he or she has to confront the realities of American racial politics. This means you will always be able to read us without roadblocks or barriers to entry. In contrast, valuable criticism can point to different paths for art and action. Wang Many social movements assert an intimacy between personal beliefs and structural oppression.

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Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry by Dorothy Wang — A Gathering of the Tribes Magazine

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Wang's passionate meditation on the inseparability of aesthetics and politics in poetry and poetics will fundamentally transform the ways in which we think racial difference and form in the literary. Yet, as Wang explains, a number of prominent critics seem to want to believe - despite the racially marked experience any American of color can describe - that no one has race. This is the first sustained study of the formal properties in Asian American poetry across a range of aesthetic styles, from traditional lyric to avant-garde. As I read this volume, I hear echoes of the ideas that arose in my conversations with Dorothy, usually over brunch. While focusing on the work of five contemporary Asian American poets—Li-Young Lee, Marilyn Chin, John Yau, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, and Pamela Lu—the book contends that aesthetic forms are inseparable from social, political, and historical contexts in the writing and reception of all poetry.

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Thinking its presence : form, race, and subjectivity in contemporary Asian American poetry (eBook, 2014) [yamakyu-fukuya.co.jp]

thinking its presence form race and subjectivity in contemporary asian american poetry

Wang shows how the racialized formation of the poets' identity is, not a cause, but a determinant of the form and language of their poetry. The depth of Wang's readings--and in them, her careful attention to biographical, historical, socio-politcal, grammatical, linguistic, and literary constructions--brings to light the complexity and the importance of understanding of the work in all of those contexts, rather than one or two of them, as a means to engender nuanced understandings of the poetry's political and social engagement which, as Wang repeatedly illustrates, is often missed or patently denied by contemporary literary critics. Photograph: Thinking its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry Dorothy J. She shows, for instance, that Li-Young Lee is a much more interesting poet than usually credited, by analyzing his slippery use of metaphor. Most Americans already know from daily life that the same spoken remark can have different implications when said by a white person to a person of color, by a white person to another white person, by a person of color to a white person, between two people of color of the same race, between two people of color of different races, and so on, and adjust their speech accordingly.

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